Software 101

Evaluating software is a lot like evaluating cars. You don’t really know what you’re getting unless you look under the hood. Just like cars, software systems can be built in a variety of ways, not all of them good. Unlike many software companies, we’re happy to let you look under the hood. We’ll put our programming practices up against anyone’s. With our software, the beauty is not just skin deep.

Properly created software is made with the best development tools available. That’s why we use Visual Studio from Microsoft. The world leader in virtually every type of software development tool available. Among our competitors, this is not always the case. Many software companies can’t bear the cost of Microsoft development tools, so they use “one-off” tools, usually free, found on the internet. As you can imagine, the results our competitors get from this strategy are, well, inconsistent.

We use “best-practices” when developing our software. Our standards are high, and they’re followed. Our developers understand that the best programs behave well and behave consistently from screen to screen. We create systems and features that look alike or different as necessary only, and, of course, they behave consistently. Many software companies, including many of our competitors, allow any programmer to work on any program in whatever manner the programmer sees fit. Since programmers must in-turn learn every other programmer’s methods, the work is performed slowly, and the resulting product is expensive and inconsistent. Our developers work in teams and the teams work together. Essentially, our development group works as one unit where everyone is as knowledgeable about our software products as everyone else and everyone builds and codes the same way. It’s an almost unheard-of way of developing software. But it is the most productive environment that delivers a more consistent product.

Problems with the Kitchen Sink Approach

All website-based software systems have the same problem, they cram lots and lots of data onto every screen. It makes sense, with website software screen changes are so very slow that the software maker needs to make sure there are fewer screens being used. The result, information overload. Users are forced to wade and navigate through unnecessary information constantly. Power users never prefer this type of environment. Power users excel when given screens that speed navigation by removing keystrokes and mouse clicks. Our software system is designed for high-speed. We show the right amount of data on every screen and deliver a workflow that you won’t find in any other system

Improving User Performance

Over the last two decades we’ve studied user behavior extensively. Always with an eye towards making each user in every department work faster, smarter and achieve better results. We’ve designed our software to utilize user behaviors, not conflict with them. Our software helps users to interact quickly by drawing the user, almost instinctively, through the data entry and collection process.

For example, the color “Red” is a dominant color. It literally forces users to look at it. Whatever it is, if it’s red, the user will see it first. The problem with red, though, is that if you use too much of it, the user won’t be able to see anything else. Our answer to this, use red very sparingly, only when information is critical, such as when a load is late for delivery or equipment is down. This is just one of hundreds of considerations that are addressed during our development process. By managing our displays in this manner, we reduce eyestrain, reduce user fatigue and speed user interactions.

We are constantly researching and constantly analyzing user behavior to create a system that users will like, but more importantly, a system where each user will be able to produce more finished work in less time. Our objective is and always has been to create a system that benefits the company, and more specifically, the company’s bottom line.